We are an interdisciplinary lab that is joint between the College of Engineering and the School of Medicine. We are affiliated with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, the Department of Biomedical Engineering, the Department of Mechanical Engineering, the Center for Neural Interfaces, the Utah Robotics Center, and the Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program. We have students from a variety of different disciplines. Our diversity breeds innovation, and to this end, we value and respect individuals from diverse backgrounds. We are an inclusive and supportive research group that is committed to promoting diversity and equality in STEM. Check out our alumni at the bottom of this page to see where our trainees end up!

 

 

 

 


Principal Investigator & Lab Director

Jacob A. George, PhD

Jacob A. George received his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering and a Certificate in Computational Science and Engineering from The University of Texas at Austin in 2016. He then received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Utah in 2018 and 2020, respectively. Dr. George briefly served as a postdoctoral fellow in the Bionic Engineering Lab at the University of Utah before joining the University of Utah as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering and the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. Dr. George has been an author on numerous peer-reviewed manuscripts and conference abstracts, and he has received millions in research funding to date. Notable accomplishments include: NSF Graduate Fellowship, NIH Postdoctoral Fellowship, CCTS Outstanding Postdoc Award, Ripple Neuro Promising Young Investigator Finalist, NIH Director’s Early Independence Award,  Utah Innovator of the Year, and Forbes 30 Under 30. Dr. George’s research has been proven to be high-impact: his 2019 publication in Science Robotics resulted in over 398 unique news articles, 450.4 million views, and $4.5 million in advertising for the University of Utah. Outside of the lab, Dr. George enjoys taking advantage of the nearby Wasatch Mountains. He is an avid hiker, mountain biker, and skier.

 


Clinical Team

Steven Edgley, MD

 

Steven Edgley is an Associate Professor in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at the University of Utah. He also serves as the Director of Stroke Rehabilitation at the University of Utah. He works closely with the NeuroRobotics Lab to help design, validate, and translate new bionic devices for stroke rehabilitation.

Jeffrey Rosenbluth, MD

 

Jeff Rosenbluth is an Associate Professor in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and the Medical Director of the Spinal Cord Injury Acute Rehabilitation program at the University of Utah. He is also the founder of Tetradapt, a company that manufactures adaptive sports equipment. Dr. Rosenbluth works closely with the NeuroRobotics Lab to help design, validate, and translate new assistive and rehabilitative devices for spinal-cord-injury patients.


Research Associates / Postdocs

Tyler S. Davis, MD, PhD

 

Tyler S. Davis received his MD and PhD from the University of Utah. He has been key personnel on a variety of neural engineering projects to date: including Utah Array implanted in primate visual cortex to restore vision, Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays implanted in human arm nerves to restore sensorimotor function, and ECoG grids on the surface of human brains to localize seizure foci. Within the NeuroRobotics Lab, Dr. Davis is leading the software development for a variety of research projects. Outside of the lab, Dr. Davis can often be found running and rock climbing.

Marta Iversen, PhD

 

Marta M. Iversen received her PhD from the University of Utah. She has extensive experience with electrophysiology in both small animal and large animal models, and she was an Assistant Professor in Neuroscience at Westminster College before joining the Utah NeuroRobotics Lab. Dr. Iversen is leading the development of novel neural signal processing and overseeing numerous graduate and undergraduate projects in the lab. Outside of the lab, Dr. Iversen enjoys hiking in the fall, skiing in the winter, biking in the spring, and gardening in the summer.


Residents

Hank Shipman, MD

 

Hank Shipman (hank.shipman@hsc.utah.edu) is a resident physician at the University of Utah in the department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation who plans to pursue fellowship training in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation. Dr. Shipman is an active contributor to the NeuroRobotics Lab, where he supports the research and development of innovations aimed at enhancing the quality of life for individuals with spinal cord injuries.

Kristen Saad, MD, MS

 

Kristen Saad (kristen.saad@hsc.utah.edu) is a resident physician in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at the University of Utah. She completed her MD at the University of Utah School of Medicine, and her MS in Systems and Control Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. She completed her thesis on distributed computing for large scale graphs and has been involved in bioastronautics, biologically-inspired robotics, big data, and medical device research. Dr. Saad supports projects utilizing functional electrical stimulation for improvement of motor tasks and spasticity following brain and spinal cord injuries. She has particular research interests in peripheral and central nerve stimulation and neuromodulation for pain control and functional restoration.


Graduate Students

Abby Harrison

 

Abby Harrison (abby.harrison@utah.edu) is currently pursuing her B.S. in Biomedical Engineering, also working in Dr. Dalrymple's lab. She is currently exploring the discriminability of two different forms of non-invasive sensory feedback - transcutaneous nerve stimulation and electrocutaneous nerve stimulation. She has also played a role in the design and development of several low-cost electromyographic recording sleeves. As former sponsored skier, Abby enjoys skiing and playing guitar.

Caleb Thomson

 

Caleb Thomson (caleb.j.thomson@utah.edu) is a Biomedical Engineering PhD student. He graduated from Utah State University with a BS in Biological Engineering with a Computer Science Minor. In his undergrad, he participated in research in tissue engineering and nano bio photonics. He also has experience working in industry for a chemical company. His research interests include adaptive EMG control algorithms for upper-limb prostheses and orthoses, and rehabilitation engineering. Outside of the lab, Caleb enjoys being active, playing basketball, hiking or biking, and playing music.

Clay Stanley

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Clay Stanley (clay.stanley@utah.edu) is an Electrical & Computer Engineering PhD student. He graduated from Letourneau University with a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering and received his M.S. in Biomedical Engineering at Arizona State University. Clay worked on projects that focused on spasticity management and spinal cord injury rehabilitation for his B.S. and M.S. degrees. His aims are to improve technology for spinal cord injury rehabilitation, with a specific interest in functional electrical stimulation. He enjoys time outdoors, playing chess, and reading.

Connor Olsen

 

Connor Olsen (connor.olsen@utah.edu) is an Electrical Engineering Ph.D. student. He graduated with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Brigham Young University and worked as a civilian engineer at Hill Air Force Base on F-16 flight simulators before coming to the University of Utah. His research centers around the development of a smart watch that uses EMG and other sensors to predict hand gestures to control a smart home environment. Outside of the lab, he enjoys cooking, painting, listening to audiobooks, and spending time with his wife and baby boy. Setup a meeting with Connor here.

Fredi R. Mino

 

Fredi Mino (fredi.mino@utah.edu) is an Electrical and Computer Engineering Ph.D. Student. He obtained his Mechatronics Engineering degree from UNC Asheville and NC State University. In his undergrad, he pursued engineering projects encompassing Computational Neuroscience, Neurotechnology, and Robotics. His interests include geometric deep learning methods for myoelectric interfaces and shared control of upper-limb assistive/rehabilitative robots. In the lab, he is currently researching feature extraction from USEA data for upper-limb prosthetics, closed-loop decoder adaptation with stroke patients (co-adaptive learning), and assistive robots for spinal-cord injury patients. In his free time, you can find him reading, sketching, or tinkering with the latest neurotech devices.

Marshall Trout

 

Marshall Trout (marshall.trout@utah.edu) is a PhD student in the Electrical and Computer Engineering department. He received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering with a minor in Biomedical Engineering from Colorado School of Mines and his M.S. in Electrical Engineering with a focus in Intelligent Systems from Clemson University. Within the NeuroRobotics Lab, he is working on developing self-aware bionic hands and working to develop and optimize a novel form of functional electrical stimulation for assisting and rehabilitating stroke and spinal-cord-injury patients. Marshall describes himself as "solar-powered" - outside of the lab he spends most of his time enjoying the outdoors.

Michael Adkins

 

Michael Adkins (michael.adkins@hsc.utah.edu) is an M.D./Ph.D. student studying Electrical and Computer Engineering. He graduated with a B.S. in Chemical Engineering and minor in Chemistry from The University of Utah. Michael is passionate about bench to bedside research and entrepreneurship and has filed patents for his previous medical device work. His research interests include developing upper limb robotic systems for the rehabilitation and assistance of stroke patients as well as the development of adaptive control systems. Outside of the lab, Michael enjoys videogames, cooking, photography, and listening to jazz music.

Monika Buczak

 

Monika Buczak (monika.buczak@utah.edu) is a Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. student. She completed her B.S. in Biomedical Engineering at Lehigh University, focusing in electronics for medical devices and researching epilepsy after traumatic brain injury. Before coming to the University of Utah, she was the R&D project manager at an orthopedic spine company. In the lab, she is leading the development of new measures of hand dexterity and thought-based control of adaptive sports technology. Monika enjoys skiing, hiking, and camping in her free time.

Troy Tully

 

Troy Tully (troy.tully@utah.edu) is a PhD student in the Biomedical Engineering department, also working in Dr. Clark's lab. His efforts in the NeuroRobotics lab involve the development of new training approaches for neuroprostheses. As a former member of the US Ski Team, Troy can often be found skiing outside of the lab.

Chandler Welch

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Chandler Welch (u1259003@utah.edu) is an MS in Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Utah. He is an MS/BS student with two years of experience in industry as an electrical designer and design automation programming. Within the NeuroRobotics Lab, he is working to develop a wearable stimulation device for haptic feedback in augmented reality simulations. Outside the lab, Chandler enjoys snowboarding and rock climbing.


Undergraduates

Ada Stewart

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Ada Stewart is an undergraduate pursuing her B.S. in Biomedical Engineering. With a background in EEG recording and analysis, she is now helping to explore methods of artificial sensory feedback for applications in rehabilitation and AR/VR. Outside the Lab Ada enjoys soccer, boxing, and snowboarding.

Amelia Nelson

 

Ava Folkman

 

Cassandra Burdick

 

Cassandra Burdick is currently an undergraduate student at the University of Utah working on her B.S. in Biomedical Engineering. She is currently working with unity to create virtual reality environments. Cassandra enjoys singing in the University’s Jazz band in her free time.

Josh Gubler

 

Kaysen Hansen

 

Kiley Cole

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Lyndsey Schultz

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Luke Jones

 

Mason Coleman

 

Mason Coleman is an undergraduate pursuing his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering and a year and a half’s experience working with biomedical machinery in industry. He is currently working on streamlining a smart watch’s design to better receive electromyographic signals without compromising current functions. Outside of the lab, Mason likes to travel, read, watch movies, play music, and spend time doing outdoor recreational sports.

Nate Toth

 

Rebecca Urban

 

Rebecca Urban is an undergraduate pre-medicine, Biomedical Engineering student at the University of Utah. Her interest in neuroscience and its impact on human physiology motivated her to join Dr. George’s NeuroRobotics Lab, where she currently focuses on the discriminability of electrocutaneous feedback. Other than school and research, Rebecca enjoys the outdoors, friends and all things French.

Sam Lewis

 

Sam is an undergraduate biomedical engineering student. He is currently researching wearable wrist EMGs for a smart home device. Outside of school and research Sam likes to mountain bike, ski and camp!

High-School Students

Mingchuan Cheng

 

Mingchuan is a student at West High School. He is passionate about math and computer science, hoping to study the latter in the future. Outside of school, he loves swimming and playing chess.

Sophie Nelson

 

Sophie is a student at Murray High School. She is interested in biology and engineering and hopes to study Biomedical engineering in the future. Outside of school, she loves volleyball and theater.

Affiliated Students

Abby Citterman

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Abby is a graduate student at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, where she is working towards her Masters in prosthetics and orthotics. In the NeuroRobotics Lab, she is leading the development and validation of a novel, non-invasive form of sensory feedback for individuals with limb loss. She is expanding this technology to applications in rehabilitation for stroke patients as well as augmented and virtual reality. She has also played an integral role in the development of an adaptable, low-cost prosthetic socket that can be used to rapidly test new devices on any upper-limb amputee. Outside of lab, Abby is an exceptional artist and enjoys painting and playing music.

Sonny Jones

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Sonny Jones is a student in the Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. program, specializing in Data Science and Computation. Sonny graduated with a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Utah. During his undergrad, he spent time performing research on projects involving advanced neuroprosthesis control with machine learning. His current research uses state of the art reinforcement learning algorithms to predict transitions between gait types. Sonny is interested in data science, machine learning, and AI. Sonny is an avid gym goer and videogame enthusiast.


Collaborators

Mark Brinton, PhD

 

Mark Brinton is an Assistant Professor in Engineering at Elizabethtown College. The Utah NeuroRobotics Lab works closely with Dr. Brinton to develop and characterize new forms of non-invasive electrical sensory feedback.

Gregory Clark, PhD

 

Greg Clark is an Associate Professor in the Biomedical Engineering department at the University of Utah. The Utah NeuroRobotics Lab works closely with Dr. Clark to develop closed-loop neuroprostheses utilizing electrodes implanted into the residual arm nerves and muscles.

Ashley Dalrymple, PhD

 

Ashley Dalrymple is an Assistant Professor in the departments of Biomedical Engineering and Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at the University of Utah. Dr. Dalrymple collaborates with the NeuroRobotics Lab on various clinical trials involving implanted neural devices. Dr. Dalrymple's lab also leads several pre-clinical animal studies that help translate the new neurotechnology into the NeuroRobotics Lab and refine existing neurotechnology used by the NeuroRobotics Lab.

Chris Duncan, MD

 

Chris Duncan is an Adjunct Assistant Professor in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at the University of Utah. He previously served as the NeuroRobotics Lab's clinical lead and was heavily involved in both engineering design and clinical recruitment. Chris has since left the University of Utah, but retains an adjunct appointment and continues to support and advance our research.

Edwin Iversen

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Ed Iversen is an Adjunct Faculty in the Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation department at the University of Utah and Vice President of Research at the Motion Control division of Fillauer. Prior to working at Motion Control, he was one of the original founders of Sarcos Robotics. Ed works closely with the NeuroRobotics Lab to develop novel prosthetic and robotic systems for individuals with neuromuscular impairments. Ed's extensive experience in industry plays a key role in helping ensure technology from the NeuroRobotics Lab is commercially viable and will be rapidly translated into the market.

Tommaso Lenzi, PhD

 

Tommaso Lenzi is an Associate Professor in the Mechanical Engineering department at the University of Utah. His Bionic Engineering Lab works closely with the NeuroRobotics Lab to develop adaptive neural control of advanced lower-limb prostheses and exoskeletons.

Jacob Segil, PhD

 

Jacob Segil is a Senior Instructor in the Mechanical Engineering department at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He works closely with the Utah NeuroRobotics Lab to develop novel sensor technologies and control algorithms for autonomous prostheses and orthoses.

David Warren, PhD

 

David Warren is an Research Associate Professor in the Biomedical Engineering department at the University of Utah. The Utah NeuroRobotics Lab works closely with Dr. Warren to develop approaches to sharing control between autonomous prostheses and human intent.


Alumni

Aaron Wang worked in the lab from May 2022 to Fall 2023 as a high school research intern. During his time in the lab, Aaron developed a wearable bracelet for high-density noninvasive transcutaneous nerve stimulation. He then we on to develop a novel technique to ensure data alignment in myoelectric control algorithms, earning him a first-author paper at the International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics. Aaron was also awarded the General Sterling Scholar of Utah while working in the lab.

Adrian worked in the NeuroRobotics lab from October 2020 to August 2021 while pursuing his B.S. in Civil Engineering and a minor in Biomedical Engineering. He led the development of a supernumerary robotic finger to enhance human dexterity. He also served as the lead mechanical designer in the lab and helped designed and build various research platform including bypass sockets, 3D-printed hands, experimental stages and housing for stimulation devices.

Aidan worked in the NeuroRobotics Lab from January 2020 to May 2022 while completing his Honor's B.S in Computer Science. Aidan's honors thesis highlights the development of an intuitive low-cost control system for assistive technology. He began by continuing work started by alumni Sri Radhakrishnan to create a low-cost and portable system system for advanced myoelectric control of prostheses. Aidan integrated the control system with various prosthetic hands and validated it's use in real-time. He then extended the applications of the low-cost control system to be used with other assistive technologies - kick starting our lab's collaborations with the TRAILS foundation and Tetradapt to bring intuitive myoelectric control to adaptive sports. During his time in the lab, Aidan achieved two first-author presentations and three research fellowship. Aidan was the first undergraduate in the lab to be selected as a Parent Fund Scholar.

Ruby worked as a high-school intern in the NeuroRobotics lab from Summer 2021 to Spring 2022. Ruby lead the development of a four-degree-of-freedom 3D-printed hand exoskeleton to assist and rehabilitate stroke patients. This work that Ruby started later evolved into a larger lab project that several students collaborated on.

Anna worked with Dr. George from 2016 to 2019 while she was pursuing her B.S. in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Utah. As a part of her Honors Thesis, Anna developed a new low-cost and non-invasive form of recording high-density electromyography from the surface of the skin. These "EMG Sleeves" have now become a staple in the NeuroRobotics lab and are used in a variety of different applications. After developing and validating these sleeves, Anna quantified their performance, optimized the number and placement of electrodes, and created a novel way to ensure sub-centimeter precision when donning and doffing the sleeves. Anna also played a major role in quantifying impact of invasive neural stimulation of electrode degradation and phantom pain reduction. As an undergraduate Anna achieved five co-author abstracts, one first-author abstract, two competitive research fellowships, two competitive research awards, and one co-author manuscript!

Brandon worked in the NeuroRobotics Lab from Summer 2021 to Spring 2022 while completing his MS in Mechanical Engineering with an emphasis on robotics. Brandon developed the first iteration of an instrumented hand-held object to quantify hand dexterity that is now widely used in the lab. The device logs various forces during hand dexterity tasks which can be used to test sensorimotor function. Brandon's work has been leveraged in dozens of projects since. During his time in the lab, Brandon achieved one co-author presentation and one co-author manuscript.

Bret Mecham completed his Masters project in the lab from April 2022 to January 2024. During that time, he created a pipeline for analyzing large-scale peripheral nerve recordings from Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays. Bret then used that pipeline to develop novel neural features that enhance the accuracy and robustness of a neuroprosthesis.

Caden worked in the NeuroRobotics Lab during Summer 2022 through the Summer Program for Undergraduate Research (SPUR). During his time in the lab, Caden worked on a Convolutional Neural Network to classify hand gestures while a Kalman filter simultaneously judged gesture intensity. His work is currently being used in the ongoing smart home project. He has returned to Mercer University, where he plans to graduate with his bachelor's in Computer Engineering in Spring 2023.

Dani worked in the NeuroRobotics lab from January 2022 to August 2023 as a postbaccalaureate student. Dani helped identify and quantify differences in muscle activity in stroke patients with hemiparesis. Data also wrote software to automatically calculate delays in muscle activation and relaxation during attempted hand movements. She also worked with Fredi Mino and Manya Murali to use these metrics as a form of biofeedback during stroke rehabilitation. As a student in the lab, Dani achieved one first-author abstract and one first-author conference proceeding. Dani also was awarded a large fellowship from the NIH to support her training.

Dillon worked in the lab during the summer of 2021 as a part of the Summer Program for Undergraduate Research. He led the development of an actuated power grasp and actuated wrist flexion/extension exoskeleton that can be used alongside clinical exoskeletons to improve patients' dexterity. Dillon's work helped establish new research directions in the lab and strengthened industry connections with clinical exoskeleton companies like Myomo.

Elaine Wong

During her time in the lab, Elaine helped develop a miniature, low-cost, wireless myoelectric sensor that can be used to provide thought-based control of smart IoT devices. Elaine received two undergraduate fellowships for her work on this project. Elaine's research culminated with a working prototype capable of wirelessly sending 8 channels of electromyography in real-time. This tiny sensor has since served as the basis for two new research grants in the lab! Elaine was also a recipient of the highly prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program.

Gabe worked with Troy Tully and Dr. George between 2021 and 2023 investigating data augmentation techniques for myoelectric prosthetic control while getting his B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering. Using deep and shallow convolutional neural networks Gabe successfully found improved ways for decoding motor intent when using large datasets. Gabe also loves low-level computer science and mechatronics!

Henry Cope worked in the lab from April 2023 to December 2023 as a part of his MS in Electrical & Computer Engineering. Henry developed a wearable and low-profile printed circuit board for recording electromyography from surface muscles. Henry's design was the first demonstration of a wireless and wearable EMG sensor for clinical applications, such as control of adaptive technologies or biofeedback training.

Garrison worked with Dr. George and Dr. Brinton from 2016 to 2018 while he was pursuing his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Utah. Garrison lead the development of a low-cost and portable system for high-voltage stimulation. This technology is now widely used in the NeuroRobotics Lab for electrocutaneous sensory feedback, transcutaneous sensory feedback, and transcutaneous functional nerve stimulation. As an undergraduate Garrison achieved one co-author abstract, two competitive research fellowships, and one co-author manuscript!

Jared Zollinger worked in the lab from January 2021 to January 2024 while pursuing his BS and MS in Biomedical Engineering. During that time, Jared oversaw the development of a low-cost platform for advanced electromyographic control. Jared integrated various electromyographic sensors, control algorithms, and robotic technologies (e.g., powered skis, prostheses) into a NVIDIA Jetson. Jared showcase this system through a co-author conference proceeding and a first-author conference presentation.

Jérémi Godbout worked in the lab from December 2021 until May 2023, when he completed his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering at the U. He earned the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) award to fund his work in developing a vibrotactile feedback device for adaptive sports applications. Jeremi developed both hardware and software for the project and presented his work at the 2022 Undergraduate Research Symposium. Jeremi is continuing his education as a Ph.D. student in the biomedical engineering department.

Kennedy worked in the NeuroRobotics lab from October 2020 to October 2021 while also completing on the University of Utah track team. During her time in the lab, she helped develop a supernumerary robotic finger to enhance human dexterity. She played a key role in the mechanical design of the supernumerary digit and lead the development of a small embedded systems for controlling the digit in real-time.

Manya joined the lab for the Summer of 2023. As part of the U's SPUR program, she designed, implemented, and tested an EMG diagnostic system that provides real-time feedback to stroke patients during a rehabilitation task. She validated this system by collecting data from stroke patients and presented the results at the SPUR conference.

Matt Ludlow was an high-school intern in the NeuroRobotics Lab during the summer of 2021. During his time in the lab, Matt helped design and motorize a hand exoskeleton for stroke patient rehabilitation. He played a critical role in revamping the 3D-printing pipeline in the lab, and contributed mechanical designs to a variety of different projects. During his time in the lab he achieved one co-author poster presentation.

Michael was an affiliate and close collaborators of the NeuroRobotics lab from August 2017 to January 2022 while he was working on his PhD in Biomedical Engineering under the supervision of Dr. Greg Clark. As a member of Center for Neural Interfaces, Michael played in integral role in developing various technologies currently being utilized in our NeuroRobotics Lab. Three notable contributions we now use regularly are: 1) a bypass socket that allows healthy individuals to control and test myoelectric prostheses, 2) a method for quantifying cognitive load associated with prosthetic control & feedback strategies, and 3) an integrated device for vibrotactile feedback of robotic devices. Michaels first job after his PhD was at Facebook Reality Labs, which coincided with the Utah NeuroRobotics Lab receiving a $150,000 grant from Facebook Reality Labs to ensure neural interfaces for controlling virtual and augmented reality are inclusive to all users.

Nathan worked with Dr. George from 2016 to 2020 while he was pursuing his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Utah. Nathan lead the development of a novel 3D-printed, lightweight, inexpensive and adaptive prosthetic wrist. Through this project he created pipelines in the lab for rapid 3D-printing prototyping, serial communication, servo motor evaluation, and the hand dexterity test known as the clothespin relocation task. As an undergraduate Nathan achieved one co-author abstracts, two first-author abstract, two competitive research fellowships, and one competitive research award, one co-author manuscript, and one first-author manuscript! Nathan also received the highly prestigious National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

Nathan made significant contributions during his tenure in the research lab from January 2022 to August 2023. He worked on two key projects - a 3D printed 5-degree-of-freedom upper arm exoskeleton and wrist WMG electrode size analysis. Nathan's responsibilities included literature review, performance metric establishment, and electrode design. His exceptional work earned him a UROP semester, and he presented his research through two poster presentations. Nathan has joined the NERVES lab, led by Dr. Ashley Dalrymple, continuing his impactful work in biomedical engineering.

Paul worked with Dr. George from 2017 to 2020 while he was pursuing his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Utah. Paul developed two new technologies for the lab: 1) a motion-tracking data glove for recording hand kinematics, and 2) an embedded electrode pad for non-invasive electrocutaneous stimulation. Paul also helped establish a pipeline in the NeuroRobotics lab for recruiting healthy individuals to serve as pilot volunteers for new neurorobotic technology. As an undergraduate Paul achieved two co-author abstracts, one first-author abstract, two competitive research fellowships, and two co-author manuscripts!

Peri Harward

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Peri Harward is an undergraduate pursuing a B.S. in Computer Science, and contributed to the data augmentation project. Outside of the lab, Peri enjoys rock climbing, hiking, and gardening.

Tara worked in the NeuroRobotics Lab in Spring 2022 while finishing her Computer Engineering MS. Within the lab, Tara led the exploration to find an optimal feature generation method for peripheral nerve interfaces to help guide the development of dexterous neuroprostheses. This pioneering work led to a long-standing collaboration with the startup company Biological Input/Output Systems as well as the basis for several research grants.

Shaila worked in the NeuroRobotics Lab from Summer 2021 to Spring 2022 as an MS student in the Electrical and Computer Engineering. During her time in the lab, Shaila led an investigation into how hand kinematics change and recovery after neuromuscular impairments. Her work involved tracking hand kinematics as individuals grasped various objects. The system she developed for tracking hand kinematics is still widely used by the lab today.

Spencer worked with the NeuroRobotics Lab from 2018 to 2021 while he was pursuing his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. Spencer pioneered the tech behind two new devices in the lab: A tiny low-cost 8-channel EMG chip, and an Arduino-based high-voltage transcutaneous stimulator for sensory feedback and animating limbs. During his time in the lab he achieved two co-author abstracts, one first-author abstract, two competitive research fellowships, and two competitive research awards!

Spencer Webb worked in the NeuroRobotics Lab from Summer 2022 to Spring 2023. He obtained his MS in Mechanical Engineering Robotics Track degree from the University of Utah and his BS in Mechanical Engineering from Brigham Young University. While working in the NeuroRobotics Lab, he helped develop a wearable multiarticulate bionic arm with four degrees of freedom that can be readily controlled using motion capture of the contralateral limb. This also involved helping to develop a Matlab class used to control the motion capture device (Leap Motion Gemini) for many projects throughout the lab.

Sri worked with Dr. George from 2017 to 2020 while he was pursuing his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Utah. Sri lead the development of a new low-cost control system for advanced myoelectric prostheses. As an undergraduate Sri achieved one co-author abstract, three first-author abstracts, two competitive research fellowships, two competitive research awards, and one co-author manuscript!

Taylor worked as an affiliate to the NeuroRobotics Lab while pursuing his PhD student in Biomedical Engineering under collaborator Dr. David Warren. Taylor lead the development and validation of an intelligent prosthesis capable of dexterously manipulating objects autonomously. He also spearheaded the lab's research in myoelectric control for spinal-cord-injury patients. Beyond his research contributions, Taylor also played a key role in mentoring some of the earliest graduate students in the NeuroRobotics Lab. The NeuroRobotics Lab would certainly not be what it is today if it were not for Taylor's early and key contributions.

Wyatt Fullmer

Wyatt worked with the NeuroRobotics Lab during the summer of 2021 as a part of the Rural & Underserved Utah Training Experience, Wyatt led the development of a new non-invasive brain-computer interface that uses conductive thread embedded into clothing to record an individuals motor intent and monitor their fitness. His work marked the first lower-limb application from the NeuroRobotics lab and served as the grounds for several new exciting research collaborations.

Zachary worked as an affiliate researcher in the lab from Fall 2021 to Summer 2023 while employed at Biological Input Output Systems. Zach helped incorporated some of the technology BIOS licensed from the Utah NeuroRobotics Lab into the company's products. Zach's contributions at the intersection of academia and industry helped ensure the successful translation of our technology into the marketplace. Zach also worked on new techniques to analyze neural data to extend the longevity of implanted neural interfaces. Zach's contributions on this project resulted in a $129K industry sponsored research project to further develop these innovative neural analyses.